Summit Europe, Singularity University’s First Public Event, Coming November 15-16 To Budapest

Start-ups didn’t have to worry about laying their own cables; they just piggybacked off the existing ones. As the market flourished with more ISPs, according to the New America Foundation’s Danielle Kehl, some of those providers even began building their own Internet infrastructure that could compete with the big carriers. As a result, a 100 megabit-per-second, triple-play bundle now costs around $35 which is 17 times as fast and roughly half as expensive as the most cost-effective Internet plan in the United States. The U.S. market could have turned out much like that. In fact, with the telephone industry, it did. But then the FCC decided not to regulate broadband the same way. Whereas telecom providers had to practice unbundling, Internet providers didn’t the better to encourage them to build more infrastructure , or so the logic went. If all the companies expected to freeload, nobody would take the responsibility to lay the cables. Today, that means every ISP owns its own network. But it also means there are fewer competitors in the marketplace. “In the year 2000, there were 9,000 ISPs in the United States,” Kehl told me. After the FCC steered clear of unbundling for broadband, she said, the number fell by 74 percent to less than 2,500 in 2005. Now that the market for broadband has become so empty, net neutrality is one of the few policies that can keep the Internet open and affordable, Kehl said.

Russia makes new threats over Ukraine’s pro-Europe policy

This special two-day program will play host to a theater of 800 to be held at the historic Franz Liszt Academy of Music and will profile some of Singularity Universitys most in-demand faculty, including co-founder Ray Kurzweil. The program aims to stimulate an awareness and discussion among the public of the global impact that exponential technologies will have in shaping our future whether youre an executive, policy maker or entrepreneur. A preview of the event is highlighted in the following video: Over the course of the program, participants will gain a deeper understanding of the robotics revolution, the security challenges of an increasing digital world, the future of energy, innovations in biotech and medicine that are transforming the role of physicians, and the resulting impact on ethics, society, the economy, and the regulatory environment. Participants will understand what these changes mean for future business opportunities in Europe and beyond. Furthermore, a showcase of the breakthrough startups accelerated at Singularity University Labs will highlight the entrepreneurs and innovators working to improve the lives of billions around the world. In parallel, free design and technology workshops (open to the public) will also be held in downtown Budapest that will host hands-on workshops for kids including topics related to robotics, strawberry DNA and the tools of 3D printing. Even though the Summit isnt until November, the excitement surrounding the event is already building. Last Thursday in Budapest, Singularity University held a launch party for the Summit Europe hosted by the Commercial Section of the U.S. Embassy in Budapest. U.S. Commercial Counselor, Robert Peaslee, was in attendance with a host of regional organizations to celebrate Singularity Universitys 5th anniversary and the upcoming November event. This is an incredible opportunity to join innovators, executives, and policy makers to understand the opportunities presented by the defining technologies of our age. Bringing Singularity University to Budapest has been spearheaded by a passionate team of alumni; they includeSummit Europes Founding Directors Botond Bognar and Csaba Szabo, both part of SUs Ambassador program in Europe, in conjunction with Ann Rogan, Director of Global Development at SU. To learn more about Summit Europe, you can download the brochure , view the Summit Europe website , or register through the Summits designated portal .

What Europe can teach us about keeping the Internet open and free

“We are convinced that the signing (of the agreements with the EU) does not hold any risks (for Russia),” he said, adding that he would give personal assurances of this to Russia and its trade allies in the Moscow-led Customs Union. He also expressed frustration at Russia’s refusal to cut the price of the gas it sells to Ukraine and said Kiev may have to reduce further the volume of its gas imports. Ukraine’s pro-Europe drive has already drawn threats of counter-measures from Russian President Vladimir Putin, as well as pressure on Kiev to join the Customs Union. Speaking after Azarov on Saturday, Sergei Glazyev, an aide to Putin, returned to the attack, saying that Russia might be obliged to impose duties on any goods arriving from Ukrainian territory, at a huge financial cost to Ukraine. Saying 40 percent of Ukrainians had doubts over the agreements with the EU, Glazyev, who has made hawkish comments before about Ukraine’s pro-Europe policy, urged the Kiev government to ballot its people. “Let us … ask the Ukrainian people what choice they prefer,” he said. TYMOSHENKO RELEASE Azarov had sharp words for Russia over its refusal to cut the price of its gas, which hangs heavy on Ukraine’s cash-strapped economy. Ukraine pays what it sees as an exorbitant $400 per thousand cubic meters under a 2009 contract, which Russia has refused to redraw. In a bid to break away from reliance on Russia, Ukraine hopes to find alternative energy sources through shale gas exploration and imports from other sources. Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich on Friday reiterated that Kiev was committed to signing the agreements with the EU at a November 28 summit in Vilnius, Lithuania, marking a pivotal shift away from Russia. But he refused to say whether he would free his jailed political rival, former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko, who the EU says is a victim of ‘selective justice’. Tymoshenko was sentenced to seven years in jail in 2011 for abuse of office after a trial that she says was a vendetta by Yanukovich. Former Polish president Aleksander Kwasniewski, who is involved in mediation missions on behalf of the EU to get Tymoshenko released, urged Yanukovich to free her for medical treatment in Germany.